Monthly Archives: June 2015

FRC’s Tony Perkins says it all about leadership

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Tony Perkins says it all about leadership

History will criticize George W. Bush for plenty of things, but his ability to lead will not be one of them. “I have a different vision of leadership,” the 43rd President once said. “A leader is someone who brings people together.” Whether or not Americans agreed with where President Bush was leading, they had no doubt that he was.

Seven years later, under a vastly different administration, the nation is in serious turmoil. And the strong, decisive leadership it once knew, is gone. Like his predecessor, President Obama has had his share of crises. From Sandy Hook to Boston, the tests of leadership have been significant — but the response far different. After the horror in Charleston, a weary Obama stood at the podium and acknowledged, “I’ve had to make statements like this too many times.”

Unfortunately for America, rarely have they inspired the same reassurance and resolve the country has known from his predecessors. Too often, President Obama has sown division in place of solace, agenda in place of understanding, and rhetoric in place of action. Yesterday’s speech was no different. We agree with the President that “there is something particularly heartbreaking about a death happening in a place in which we seek… peace.”

But the irony of that statement is that he makes it as the leader of an administration that has done everything it can to create a culture — not of violence — but of hostility to the very religious expression he now memorializes. No one should be afraid to go to church to celebrate their faith or leave church to practice their faith in their community. “[W]e know,” the President went on, “the hatred across races and faiths pose a particular threat to our democracy and our ideals.”

Sadly, Americans no longer have a concept of what true hatred is. Thanks to the twisted distortions of the Left, the very meaning of the word has been diluted from what it really is — animating senseless murder and violence — to political dissent. This is hatred — gunning down men and women in cold blood — not the act of disagreeing over moral views. Liberals fail to see the difference, instead recklessly labeling opponents “hateful” simply for believing differently than they do.

Hate is what motivates men like this to slaughter innocent people. It’s what drives such a disrespect for humanity that men like Floyd Corkins can walk into FRC with the intent to kill as many people as possible. While the White House bemoans our culture of animosity, it continues to inflame it through policies that accelerate moral decline and family breakdown. But instead of recognizing the root cause of moral breakdown, it blames the violence on a familiar scapegoat: gun control.

As Americans, we must have the honesty to step back and examine the real issues, even if the President continues exploiting these tragedies to accomplish his ultimate goal: expanding government at the expense of personal freedom. “The real work of reducing violent crime is the work of rebuilding the family,” FRC’s Dr. Pat Fagan has said. Yet the President continues to seize on the moment to place blame where it does not belong. “[W]e do know that once again, innocent people were killed in part because someone who wanted to inflict harm had no trouble getting their hands on a gun.”

The reality is, someone who wants to inflict harm will find a way. Ask the amputees in Boston, or the Christians in Syria. Is ISIS using guns to behead its victims? No. The government can’t make us safer until it recognizes that the problem isn’t the instruments of violence — but the environment of it. Stronger gun laws wouldn’t have prevented the deaths of those nine people in South Carolina, any more than it would have stopped Floyd Corkins from walking into our lobby and shooting Leo Johnson. “The heart of the matter is not guns,” Dr. Ben Carson told Fox News’s Megyn Kelly yesterday. “The heart of the matter is the heart.”

What happened in the basement of that Charleston church should be an opportunity for earnest soul-searching in this nation — not an excuse to push an agenda that at best ignores America’s problems, and at worst, exacerbates them. It’s time to recognize that the cure for violence, for racism, for hatred isn’t in Washington. It’s in pulpits just like African Methodist Episcopal’s, where real reconciliation is possible. The church must lead. And this President must step away from his assault on faith and let it.

 

Marie Coppola. June 2015

The fight for marriage is far from over.

Biology. Tradition. Children.

…the Constitution?

Rubbish.

So said the Supreme Court of the United States this morning in a 5-4 decision striking down laws in every state passed by the people upholding marriage.

Today we got the “Roe v. Wade of marriage” — where the Court pretends to settle a controversial social question by judicial fiat, while the rest of America says: “no way.”

For years same-sex marriage advocates have knowingly lied and deceived the public. They first claimed that they simply wanted the right to ‘marry’ the person they love. And yet where same-sex marriage has been approved, a tiny percentage of gay people got married.

They claimed homosexuality was genetic, but now say ‘gender’ and ‘sexual identity’ is a choice.

They claimed the mantle of tolerance and diversity — and yet have betrayed those same principles in attacking anyone that disagrees. Speak up for marriage in any public place today and you will be shamed and shunned, or worse.

So what is really at stake?

For many in the LGBT movement, the marriage debate is merely a proxy for a much larger revolution underway. Their end goal is to destroy marriage altogether, including the family, religion, and any institution that proposes limits on human behavior, especially sexual behavior.

They believe gender is a social construct and that children should be brought into the world outside of the traditional family. For many, the idea that men and women are made for each other or that children deserve a mother and a father is a form of discrimination.

This is what the fight for marriage is ultimately about — and why it’s far from over.

Some things to ponder:

    • The world did not just end. The Court decision is a reflection of our deeply lost and misguided culture. Judges don’t change reality.

 

    • According to a recent survey approximately 1.6% of Americans describe themselves as gay. And even where gay marriage has been made legal, a tiny percentage actually get married. The media has and will continue to massively overstate the prevalence of same-sex unions.

 

    • With the gay ‘marriage’ decision considered ‘settled,’ the predictable assault on religious liberty can finally be unmasked. Gay groups will inevitably begin to splinter and disagree on what comes next. Their overreach will come, and there will be a backlash, politically and culturally.

 

    • If and when forms of persecution come, rejoice. “Blessed are you when they insult you and persecute you and utter every kind of evil against you [falsely] because of me. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven.” (Matthew 5:11-12).

 

  • Look around you (especially in you live in Charleston, SC). Americans are still good people, devoted to faith, family, and children. Remember 50 million Americans voted to defend marriage. No rainbow flag, Supreme Court decision, or minority living in San Francisco or New York is going to change that.

In many ways the tables have now been flipped, with the burden of showing respect, tolerance and opposing discrimination now in the hands of the gay-marriage movement.

Will they respect the right of ordinary Americans who believe in male-female marriage to live out this time-honored truth?

Today is the feast of St. Josemaria. With today’s news, it’s good to be reminded now more than ever of our calling to be saints in the world.

This is a time for prayer and bold witness.

So much to do.

So many people need Christ.