Settling into Your New Job

                 

A mind that is stretched by new experiences can  never go back  to its old dimensions.     Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

You finally landed that job you were praying you would get!   Monday is here and it’s your first day.  Here are some tips to help you ‘settle in’ your new surroundings with confidence and a positive attitude, along with some precautions.

1) Try to arrive at least  10 or 15 minutes before the normal starting hours. This not only gives you time to settle in, turn your computer on, or listen to voice mail messages.  It also gives you a relaxed frame of mind for friendly good mornings instead of rushing in at the last minute or a few minutes late and get a reputation for ‘always being late’.

Employees who arrive before the workday begins are usually the ones who get good reviews and/or promotions. Likewise advice on leaving at the end of the day. Plan on staying 15 minutes or so after work if possible; never leave early – someone always loves to make an issue about that and the reputation will stick.   Those who usually get ahead in a workplace arrive a little earlier and leave a little later.

2) Start the new job with a To Do List. This List itemizes tasks that may have been sent to you via email, voicemail or verbally.   Jot it down so it is not forgotten and when you have a few minutes, prioritize the List by importance. If you don’t get to it all that day, start the next day’s List with the undone items so they can have first attention. Keep a file folder with the checked-off ‘Done’ items, date they were completed, with any information that may be needed in the future for follow-up.

Not only do ‘To Do’ Lists give you a reputation for getting things done, they also give you a feeling of accomplishment as you go over the list and view the things you did that day. On a hectic and busy day, those accomplishments will help neutralize the feeling that you ‘got nothing done today’.

3) Go slow getting to know your new co-workers.   In your ‘being new’ nervousness, you may reveal more about yourself than you really want to. You may be telling your life history to the office gossiper.  If you are asked to lunch with the group, be neutral to everyone, polite and friendly. The work environment is revealed at lunchtime, and you will hear inside scoops of what is going on with work, projects and people.

Don’t make judgments or remarks. Wait until you get to know the people and the issues and not even then.   And don’t repeat what you hear at lunch or in the halls to your co-workers. Gossip spreads through offices faster than forest fires. And your name will be attached to it.

4) Go to lunch at your appointed lunch time and take the one-half hour or whatever the rule is. Some companies allot 45 minutes or one hour for lunch. Long-time employees may stretch their lunch times from the one-half hour lunch to a 45 minute or one hour lunch. That’s their choice, but as a new employee, you don’t want to get a reputation that you ‘take long lunches’.  It’s a title that you may earn quickly and it will stick with you. Your supervisor will know about it sooner than you think.    Co-workers usually stagger lunch times so that someone is always available, and you will get off on the wrong foot in  if someone is waiting for you to come back from lunch and you’re late and taking time away from their own lunch.

5) Start off your new job with a team attitude. There are different ways to help someone out even if it is picking up their mail or copy order at office services. Your helpfulness will reflect back from your co-workers who will do the same for you. This becomes invaluable on a really busy day when you need an extra set of hands; kindness goes a long way and people react positively to it.
When someone turns their back on being a team player with the rest of the group, the group usually reacts in the same manner.

A first good impression of a newcomer usually casts a lasting reflection of him or her them for future work experience.  By the way, these tips can also be adapted to those first days of college.   Good luck in your new surroundings!

Marie Coppola © Revised  March 2019

St. Patrick’s Day

 

 

St. Patrick’s Day is March 17th

Patrick was born to wealthy Christian parents a little over 1,600 years ago in the British Isles.  St. Patrick wasn’t born in Ireland; his parents were Roman citizens (son of Calpurnius, a Roman-British deacon and Conchessa) living in modern-day England, or more precisely in Scotland or Wales (scholars cannot agree on which). He was born in 385 AD. By that time, most Romans were Christians and the Christian religion was spreading rapidly across Europe.

At the age of 16, while on his father’s country estate, he was kidnapped by pirates and taken to then pagan Ireland where he was sold as a slave.  He spent several years in Ireland herding sheep and learning about the people there.  Despite the demands of his life there, he kept his faith and  began contemplation and understanding of prayers.  At the age of 22, he managed a miraculous  escape;  he made his way to a monastery in England where he spent 12 years growing closer to God. After six years of servitude, he escaped and found a ship that took him back home.   He had a dream which told him to go back and Christianize Ireland.  Eventually, Patrick was ordained a priest and later a bishop, after which he was granted his wish to go back to Ireland.

St. Patrick used the shamrock to preach about the trinity.    Many claim the shamrock represents faith, hope, and love, or any number of other things but it was actually used by Patrick to teach the mystery of the Holy Trinity, and how three things, the Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit could be separate entities, yet one in the same. Obviously, the pagan rulers of Ireland found Patrick to be convincing because they quickly converted to Christianity.

According to legend, St. Patrick drove all the snakes, or in some translations, “toads,” out of Ireland. In reality, this probably did not occur, as there is no evidence that snakes have ever existed in Ireland, the climate being too cool for them to thrive. Despite that, scholars suggest that the term “snakes” may be figurative and refer to pagan religious beliefs and practices rather than reptiles or amphibians.

The original color associated with St. Patrick is blue, not green as commonly believed. In several artworks depicting the saint, he is shown wearing blue vestments.  Green was associated with the country later, presumably because of the greenness of the countryside, which is so because Ireland receives plentiful rainfall. Today, the country is also referred to as the “Emerald Isle.”

His mission to Ireland lasted 30 years. During that time, he established monasteries, churches and schools throughout the country. He is credited with its eventual conversion.   He died March 17, 461 A.D.

The Irish have observed this religious holiday for thousands of years. But, how did we come to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in the United States?  There are more Irish in the USA than Ireland.  Well, sort of. An estimated 34 million Americans have Irish ancestry. Some are pure-blood Irish, meaning they or their parents came from Ireland, but many more have mixed ancestry today. By contrast, there are 4.2 million people living in Ireland.    North America has only observed this holiday since the late eighteenth century. Even though not a legal holiday in the USA, St. Patrick’s Day is widely recognized and celebrated throughout the country with Irish festivals, parades, food like corn beef and cabbage, drinking green beer, and prominent displaying of the color green and Irish traditions.
Marie Coppola  Revised March 2019

 

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What is Socialism?

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Socialism is repeated often from our 2020 Democratic  presidential candidates.   Socialist centrally-planned economics invariably fail due to their inherent and integral failure to encourage, develop and nurture the essential potential of its people by lack of ‘incentivation’ which is the practice of building incentives in order to motivate the people within it.   

Socialism is a failure because it suppresses the human spirit and has caused the collapse of many countries.

Saul David Alinsky (January 30, 1909 – June 12, 1972) was a Jewish American community organizer and writer. He is generally considered to be the founder of modern community organizing. He is often noted for his 1971 book Rules for Radicals.  The following is based on Alinsky’s eight steps from democracy to socialist society.  Barack Obama quotes him often in his book and Hillary Clinton did her thesis on Alinsky.   Here is Alinsky’s  list on how to achieve socialism. 

There are 8 levels of control that must be obtained before a country is  able to create a socialist/communist State.  The first is the most important.

1. Healthcare:  “Control Healthcare and you control the People”.

2. Poverty:  Increase the Poverty level as high as possible.”  Poor People are easier to control and will not fight back if the government is providing everything for them to live.

3.  Debt: Increase the National Debt to an unsustainable level.”  That way you are able to increase Taxes, and this will produce more Poverty.

[4.  Gun Control:  Remove the ability to defend themselves from the Government.  That way you are able to create a Police State – total local control.

5.  Welfare:  Take control of every aspect of their lives (Food, Livestock, Housing, and Income).

6.  Education:  Take control of what people read & listen to, take control of what children learn in School.

7.  Religion: Remove faith in God from the Government and Schools.

8.  Class Warfare:  Divide the People into the Wealthy against the Poor.  Racially divide. This will cause more discontent and it will be easier to Tax the Wealthy with full support of the voting Poor.

The bases are all covered!  We are ripe!  Fundamental Transformation is happening to our Great Country.

In the course of nearly four decades of political organizing, Alinsky received much criticism, but also gained praise from many public figures. His organizing skills were focused on improving the living conditions of poor communities across North America.

Time magazine wrote in 1970 that “It is not too much to argue that American democracy is being altered by Alinsky’s ideas. Conservative author William F. Buckley, Jr. said in 1966 that Alinsky was “very close to being an organizational genius.