Tag Archives: #Leadership

FRC’s Tony Perkins says it all about leadership

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Tony Perkins says it all about leadership

History will criticize George W. Bush for plenty of things, but his ability to lead will not be one of them. “I have a different vision of leadership,” the 43rd President once said. “A leader is someone who brings people together.” Whether or not Americans agreed with where President Bush was leading, they had no doubt that he was.

Seven years later, under a vastly different administration, the nation is in serious turmoil. And the strong, decisive leadership it once knew, is gone. Like his predecessor, President Obama has had his share of crises. From Sandy Hook to Boston, the tests of leadership have been significant — but the response far different. After the horror in Charleston, a weary Obama stood at the podium and acknowledged, “I’ve had to make statements like this too many times.”

Unfortunately for America, rarely have they inspired the same reassurance and resolve the country has known from his predecessors. Too often, President Obama has sown division in place of solace, agenda in place of understanding, and rhetoric in place of action. Yesterday’s speech was no different. We agree with the President that “there is something particularly heartbreaking about a death happening in a place in which we seek… peace.”

But the irony of that statement is that he makes it as the leader of an administration that has done everything it can to create a culture — not of violence — but of hostility to the very religious expression he now memorializes. No one should be afraid to go to church to celebrate their faith or leave church to practice their faith in their community. “[W]e know,” the President went on, “the hatred across races and faiths pose a particular threat to our democracy and our ideals.”

Sadly, Americans no longer have a concept of what true hatred is. Thanks to the twisted distortions of the Left, the very meaning of the word has been diluted from what it really is — animating senseless murder and violence — to political dissent. This is hatred — gunning down men and women in cold blood — not the act of disagreeing over moral views. Liberals fail to see the difference, instead recklessly labeling opponents “hateful” simply for believing differently than they do.

Hate is what motivates men like this to slaughter innocent people. It’s what drives such a disrespect for humanity that men like Floyd Corkins can walk into FRC with the intent to kill as many people as possible. While the White House bemoans our culture of animosity, it continues to inflame it through policies that accelerate moral decline and family breakdown. But instead of recognizing the root cause of moral breakdown, it blames the violence on a familiar scapegoat: gun control.

As Americans, we must have the honesty to step back and examine the real issues, even if the President continues exploiting these tragedies to accomplish his ultimate goal: expanding government at the expense of personal freedom. “The real work of reducing violent crime is the work of rebuilding the family,” FRC’s Dr. Pat Fagan has said. Yet the President continues to seize on the moment to place blame where it does not belong. “[W]e do know that once again, innocent people were killed in part because someone who wanted to inflict harm had no trouble getting their hands on a gun.”

The reality is, someone who wants to inflict harm will find a way. Ask the amputees in Boston, or the Christians in Syria. Is ISIS using guns to behead its victims? No. The government can’t make us safer until it recognizes that the problem isn’t the instruments of violence — but the environment of it. Stronger gun laws wouldn’t have prevented the deaths of those nine people in South Carolina, any more than it would have stopped Floyd Corkins from walking into our lobby and shooting Leo Johnson. “The heart of the matter is not guns,” Dr. Ben Carson told Fox News’s Megyn Kelly yesterday. “The heart of the matter is the heart.”

What happened in the basement of that Charleston church should be an opportunity for earnest soul-searching in this nation — not an excuse to push an agenda that at best ignores America’s problems, and at worst, exacerbates them. It’s time to recognize that the cure for violence, for racism, for hatred isn’t in Washington. It’s in pulpits just like African Methodist Episcopal’s, where real reconciliation is possible. The church must lead. And this President must step away from his assault on faith and let it.

 

Marie Coppola. June 2015

Jesus Christ CEO – Leadership Exemplar – A Book Review


Using Ancient Wisdom for Visionary Leadership 

Many books have been written about good examples of leadership. The book, Jesus, CEO; Using Ancient Wisdom for Visionary Leadership by Laurie Beth Jones is well-written, and a highly useful example of the characteristics of biblically-based leadership applicable to our management world today. Her book brings together the hard and soft skills of love, inspiration and good will into any organization’s leaders or team leaders.

A preface in the introduction of this book states: “One person trained twelve human beings who went on to so influence the world that time itself is recorded as being before (B.C.) or after (A.D.) his existence.

 

This person worked with a staff that was totally human and not divine…a staff that in spite of illiteracy, questionable backgrounds, fractious feelings, and momentary cowardice went on to accomplish the tasks he trained them to do. They did this for one main reason – to be with him again.

His leadership style was intended to be put to use by any of us.” Much can be learned from Jesus’ visionary leadership style today as much as it was 2000 years ago.

The author, a successful businesswoman, believes that Jesus’ management style incorporates the best of masculine and feminine leadership styles, by harnessing spiritual energy, so that both males and females can become empowered leaders. She explains that this can be done by using three categories of strengths: 1] the strength of self-mastery; 2] the strength of action and 3] the strength of relationships.

The chapters are easily read and translate the process by which Jesus performed the above categories of strengths. Some of the chapter titles are:

Self-Mastery

His Statements are What he Becomes

He Kept in Constant Contact with his Boss

He Stuck to his Mission

He Believed in Himself

He Guarded his energy

He did not Waste Time Judging Others

He had a Passionate Commitment to the Cause

He Worked through his Fears

Strength of Action

He took Action

He had a Plan; He formed a Team

He Broke Ranks; He Came from Left Field and Branched Out

He Trained his Replacements

Strength of Relationships

He Clearly Defined their Work-related Benefits

He Treated them as Equals

He Held them Accountable

He Set an Example for Them

He Looked out for the Little Guys; He Served Them; Defended Them and Gave Them Authority

He Loved Them to the End

This book is described as a must-read for college business courses. It exhibits the core competencies of training and soft skills.

© Marie Coppola   August 2013